List of Sharepoint Related Performance Counter

Counter Description Details
Total Processor Time The % Processor Time counter measures the percentage of elapsed time that the processor spends to execute a non-Idle thread Object: ProcessorCounter: %Processor TimeInstance: _Total
Processor Privileged Time Use the % Privileged Time counter to measure the percentage of elapsed time that the process threads spent executing code in Privileged mode Object: ProcessorCounter: %Privileged TimeInstance: _Total
Processor User Time Use the % User Time counter to measure the percentage of elapsed time the processor spends in User mode. Object: ProcessorCounter: % User TimeInstance: _Total
Process – W3WP Processor Time Measures the % of elapsed time that all process threads use the processor Object: ProcessCounter: %Processor TimeInstance: w3wp
Processor Queue Length If the threshold of this rule is exceeded, it indicates that the processor is not fast enough. Object: SystemCounter: Processor Queue Length
Page Faults per second Use the counter Page Faults/sec to measure the average number of pages faulted per second Object: MemoryCounter: Page Faults/sec
Available Disk Space Use the % Free Space counter to calculate the percentage of total usable space Object: LogicalDiskCounter: % Free Space_total
Disk Request Write Size Uses the Disk Write Bytes/sec counter to measure the rate at which bytes are transferred to the disk during write operations Object: PhysicalDiskCounter: Disk Write Bytes/secInstance: _Total
Disk Request Write Count Measures the rate of write operations on the disk Object: PhysicalDiskCounter: Disk Writes/secInstance: _Total
Disk Usage – Disk Time Use the % Disk Time counter to calculate the percentage of elapsed time that the selected disk drive was busy servicing read or write requests Object: PhysicalDiskCounter: %Disk TimeInstance: _Total
Disk Block Read Size Avg. Disk Bytes/Read counter to measure the average number of bytes transferred from the disk during read operations Object: PhysicalDiskCounter: Avg. Disk Bytes/ReadInstance: _Total
Disk Request Read Size Measures the rate at which bytes are transferred from the disk during read operations via Disk Read Bytes/sec Object: PhysicalDiskCounter: Disk Read Bytes/secInstance: _Total
Disk Request Read Count Measures the rate of read operations from the disk Object: PhysicalDiskCounter: Disk Reads/secInstance: _Total
Web Service Bytes Sent/sec Measures the rate at which data bytes are being sent by the Web service Object: Web ServiceCounter: Bytes Sent/secInstance: _Total
Web Service Current Connections Monitors current IIS connections Object: Web ServiceCounter: Current ConnectionsInstance: _Total (or per Web app)
Web Service Use the Total Method Requests/sec counter to measure the rate at which HTTP requests are received Object: Web ServiceCounter: Total method Requests/secInstance: _Total (or specific Web apps)
Web Service Bytes Received/sec Counter to measure the rate at which data bytes are received by the Web service Object: Web ServiceCounter: Bytes Received/secInstance: _Total (or per Web app)
Web Service Connection Attempts Measures the rate at which connections to the Web service are being attempted Object: Web ServiceCounter: Connection Attempts/secInstance: _Total
W3WP Private Bytes Measures the current size, in bytes, of memory that this process has allocated and that cannot be shared with other processes Object: ProcessCounter: Private BytesInstance: w3wp
W3WP Working Set The Working Set is the set of memory pages recently touched by the threads in the process Object: ProcessCounter: Working SetInstance:  w3wp
Committed Memory in use Use the % Committed Bytes In Use counter to measure the ratio of the Memory\Committed Bytes counter to the Memory\Commit Limit counter Object: MemoryCounter: % Committed Bytes In Use
Available Memory Available MBytes counter to measure the amount of physical memory in MB immediately available for allocation to a process or for system use Object: MemoryCounter: Available MBytes
Memory Cache Bytes Shows the sum of the Memory\System Cache Resident Bytes, Memory\System Driver Resident Bytes, Memory\System Code Resident Bytes, and Memory\Pool Paged Resident Bytes Object: MemoryCounter: Cache Bytes
.NET CLR Memory – Bytes Uses the # Bytes in all Heaps counter to sum the following four other counters: Gen 0 Heap Size; Gen 1 Heap Size; Gen 2 Heap Size, and Large Object Heap Size Object: .NET CLR MemoryCounter: # Bytes in all HeapsInstance: _Global
.Net CLR Data-SQL client Failed connections Use the SqlClient: Total # failed connects counter to count the total number of connection open attempts that have failed Object: .NET CLR DataCounter: SqlClientInstance: Total # of failed attempts
.Net CLR Data-SQL client connections Current number of active SQL connections Object: .NET CLR DataCounter: SqlClientInstance: Current # pooled and nonpooled connections
.Net CLR memory – large Objects Displays the current size of the Large Object Heap in bytes. Objects greater than 20 KB are treated as large objects by the Garbage Collector and are directly allocated in a special heap Object: .NET CLR MemoryCounter: Large Object Heap sizeInstance: _Global
Succeeded Search Queries Use the Queries Succeeded counter to count the number of queries that produce successful searches Object: SharePoint Search Indexer CatalogsCounter: Queries SucceededInstance: Search
Search Query Rate Monitors Query Rate Object: SharePoint Search Indexer CatalogsCounter: QueriesInstance: Search
Search – total # of Documents Counts the total number of documents in the Index Object: Indexing ServiceCounter: Total # of documents
Cache Faults per Second Cache activity is a reliable indicator of most application I/O operations. Object: MemoryCounter: Cache Faults/sec
ASP.NET Requests per Second Counts the number of requests per second Object: ASP.NET Apps v2.0.50727Counter: Requests/SecInstance: _Total
ASP.NET Cache – Hit ratio Cache Total Hit Ratio counter to sum the ASP.NET application performance counters Object: ASP.NET ApplicationsCounter: Cache Total Hit RatioInstance:  _Total
ASP.NET Cache Size count the total number of entries within the cache (both internal and user added Object: ASP.NET ApplicationsCounter: Cache Total EntriesInstance: _Total
Memory – pages per second Measures the rate at which pages are read from or written to disk to resolve hard page faults Object: MemoryCounter: Pages/sec
ASP.NET Worker Process Restart Measures Worker Process Restarts Object: ASP.NETCounter: Worker Process Restarts
Paging File Measures the percentage of the Page File instance in use Object: Paging FileCounter: %UsageInstance: _Total
W3WP Handle Count This number is equal to the sum of the handles currently open by each thread in this process Object: ProcessCounter: Handle CountInstance:  w3wp
Publishing Object Cache Counts the current number of pools that are associated with the process Object: SharePoint Publishing CacheCounter: Publishing cache hits/sec
Total number of ISAPI Connections Counts the number of ISAPI connections that Windows SharePoint Services is processing simultaneously. Object: Web ServiceCounter: Current ISAPI Extension RequestsInstance: _Total
Total number of ISAPI Requests Number of ISAPI Requests per second Object: Web ServiceCounter: ISAPI Extension Request/secInstance: _Total
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Tips and ways on lowering licensing cost for your MOSS Farm!

Tips and ways on lowering licensing cost for your MOSS Farm!

Some tips and ways to lower your licensing cost!

Always use Windows Server Web Edition as the MOSS front end server.
  • Windows Server Web Edition is licensed per server and allow for unlimited user.
  • Using Web Edition, you do not need to purchase CAL or external connector for your MOSS Farm.
  • Note: Web Edition does not allow installation of database; therefore you can only use Web Edition in a MOSS Farm. You need at least one Windows Server Standard or Enterprise to host the main MOSS application and/or database.
Windows Sharepoint Services (WSS) is free with Windows Server.
  • Although WSS does not have all the features that comes with MOSS, but its free with purchase of Windows Server.
  • A copy of Windows Server is $800 (for Standard edition) + CAL ($50 each) vs MOSS licensing is $4K + CAL ($80 for standard and additional $60 for enterprise add-on).
  • You can still load balance WSS exactly the same like MOSS. WSS is a good starting point if you don’t need all the MOSS features right away.
  • Note: WSS still uses the three tier setup/configuration
Depending on your requirement, if you don’t need MOSS function WSS is the cheapest way to create an extranet.
  • To Build a WSS extranet: $800 for server + $2000 for external connector = $2800
  • To Build a MOSS extranet: $800 for server + $40,000 for Internet site license = $48,000
  • Note: You still need to add CAL to all internal users.
If you are using WSS for extranet and you have less than 40 users, it is cheaper to uses the standard CAL model (one CAL for each external vendor).
  • Each Windows Server CAL is around $50, so your cut off point is 40 users. Above 40 external users will be cheaper with the external connector.
  • The same math goes for MOSS’s Internet Site license, each MOSS Standard CAL is $80 each and the Enterprise add-on is $60 each.
If you only want a SQL server as a backup (not for performance load balancing), you should setup the SQL server in Active and Passive mode
  • Passive mode SQL server is setup as a failsafe. Data are continuously copy from the Active server to Passive server (both server are power on and hot at the same time), however client request are only serve by the Active server.
  • If the Active server fails, the Passive server automatically takes over as the Active server.
  • You only need to pay for the Active server’s license (vs if it is load balanced, you need to have license for both as both server is Active and serves client request)
Windows Server Enterprise allow for 4 virtual servers.
  • You don’t need to purchase four copies of Enterprise server if you are running it in virtual server model.

Upgrading Sharepoint solution

Upgrading Sharepoint solution

Here is the commands to upgrade your Sharepoint solution without retract it (in place upgrade): 

STSADM.EXE -o upgradesolution -name solution_name.wsp -filename solution_name.wsp -immediate -allowgacdeployment

Resetting Records Center

Resetting Records Center

If your record center does not function proeprly (even after you cold booted the server), try run the following command to reactivate the record center features. 

stsadm -o activatefeature -filename recordsmanagement\feature.xml -force

Sharepoint (MOSS) Licensing – MOSS, Search Server, and Forms Server

Sharepoint (MOSS) Licensing – MOSS, Search Server, and Forms Server.

Here is the Sharepoint (MOSS)’s licensing model in simplified term and all everything you need to know related MOSS licensing (SQL, Windows, WSS, etc).
Microsoft Office Sharepoint Server 2007, Server License (MOSS)
  • Basic MOSS server license.
  • One license for each MOSS server.  One server license for each installation of the MOSS software.
  • If you have this type of license, you will need to purchase CAL for each user/device connecting to the server.
Microsoft Office Sharepoint Server 2007 Client Access License (CAL), Standard Edition
  • Client license to access the MOSS server.
  • One license for each devices or name user (will explain the differences between “device” and “name user”later in this post)
Microsoft Office Sharepoint Server 2007 Client Access License (CAL), Enterprise Edition
  • Client license to enable the MOSS server enterprise feature.
  • One license for each devices or name user which will be accessing the enterprise features (will explain the differences between “device” and “name user” later)
  • This is an add-on license to the Standard Edition, if you want to enable Enterprise function; you need to purchase one Standard plus one Enterprise CAL for each user!
  • Example if you want to have a MOSS with enterprise function for a user:
    • 1x MOSS 2007, Server License
    • 1x MOSS 2007 CAL, Standard Edition
    • 1x MOSS 2007 CAL, Enterprise Edition
  • As you can see from the above example, there isn’t really an MOSS Enterprise Server (unlike other Microsoft product such as SQL and Exchange which have a official version of Enterprise edition); however the term MOSS Enterprise Server are widely use on the Internet, which is a bit misleading from a licensing prospective. MOSS Enterprise Server is basically a MOSS Server with Enterprise CAL. With Enterprise CAL you can then “legally” enable the Enterprise function on the MOSS Server (when you enable the enterprise function it does not ask for proof of Enterprise CAL… so check your licensing before enabling it!)
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 for Internet sites (this is the replacement license for External Connector license available in 2003)
  • MOSS server license design for use as an Internet site. It is licensed per server. With this license, you can have unlimited Internet user connected to the server (unlimited number of authenticated or anonymous user). This is the license to use if you plan to build a extranet using MOSS communcation between your clients, vendors, or contractors (Microsoft define this as “non-employees”).
  • Comes with all Enterprise features.
  • Note:  All internal users will still need to puchase CAL for and the MOSS Server
  • Example if you want to have a MOSS extranet which you use to mange invoices with your clients.  You have two accountatns uploads and manges invoices on the same extranet site.
    • 1x MOSS 2007, Server License
    • 2x MOSS 2007 CAL, Standard Edition
    • 2x MOSS 2007 CAL, Enterprise Edition
    • 1x MOSS 2007, Internet Site License
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 for Search (Enterprise Edition), Server License
  • This is a subset of the functionality that is offered in the full MOSS product. All the function in Search Enterprise is already included in MOSS Enterprise (therefore, do not purchase both)
  • If you only plan to use MOSS for Search, then purchase this licensing. It is licensed per server.
Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 for Search (Standard Edition), Server License
  • Same as Search Enterprise but does not allow for load balancing, search is limited to indexing 500,000 items.
Microsoft Forms Server 2007, Server License
  • This is a subset of the functionality that is offered in the full MOSS product. All the function in Forms Server is already included in MOSS Enterprise (therefore, do not purchase both).
  • If you only plan to use MOSS for Forms (anything have to do with InfoPath), then purchase this licensing.
  • You can also mix the Forms Server with Standard Edition. Example: you want to have Sharepoint Form services, but don’t  need the entire Enterprise Suite, then you will purchase: MOSS Standard + Forms Server.
Microsoft Office Forms Server 2007 Client Access License (CAL)
  • Client license to access the MOSS Forms server.
  • One license for each devices or name user (will explain the differences between definition of “device” and “name user” later)
Microsoft Forms Server 2007 for Internet sites
  • Forms Server license design for use as an Internet site. It is licensed per server. With this license, you can have unlimited Internet user connected to the server (unlimited number of authenticated or anonymous user). This is the license to use if you plan to build a extranet using Forms server for your clients, vendors, or contractors (Microsoft define this as “non-employees”).
  • All rules listed in MOSS 2007 Internet Site license also applies to Forms Server 2007 Internet Site license
Windows Server External Connector
  • Windows SharePoint Services (WSS) is included with Windows Server. If you plan to use WSS to build extranet, this is the license you need to allow a unlimited number of clients, vendors, or contractors to access your site.
  • Note: your internal users still need additional CAL to access the site.
Device CAL (Per Device)
  • You purchase CAL for each device that accesses your server, regardless of the number of users who use that device to access the server.
  • This is ideal if you have a environments which multiple users share a single terminals (shifts, call center, etc)
User CAL (Per Name User or Per User)
  • You purchase the CAL each name user that accesses your server, regardless of the number of devices used by the user.
  • This is ideal if you have a environments which a single users access the servers from multiple devices (PDA, laptop, desktop, etc). You only need one CAL regretless of how many devices he/she have.
Mix of Licenses
  • You can mix both an Internet Site license and a Server license within the same farm.
  • Example: You can have a single farm operates both the corporate public web site, the intranet, and the extranet,
    • If you configure the two site to runs on its own individual servers within the farm, you can purchase one the Internet license and one server license for each server (If this makes more economy sense for your farm and design)
    • If you configure the two site to load balance on all the web front end servers within the farm, you need to purchase Internet site license and Server licenses for all the server in your farm (as the two site are shareing resources on the entire farm).
      • If you have 3 web front end server and 1 app server you will need the following:
        • 4x Internet Site license
        • 4x Server license
        • Plus CAL for all internal user
  • Note: Microsoft Office Forms Server and Microsoft Office Forms Server for Internet Sites cannot be mixed with Microsoft Office SharePoint Server and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server for Internet Sites. (as Sharepoint Server already have Forms server included)
Enable MOSS Enterprise Features
  • Once a Server’s enterprise function is enable you must acquire enterprise CAL for all user on using the server.   (this is a farm level central administration setting, so you can’t disable it per site)
Microsoft SQL Server CAL licensing model
  • Same as MOSS’s CAL model.
  • One license for each devices or name user.
  • You need a SQL CAL for each MOSS user if you plan to use this licensing model for the SQL server in your MOSS Farm.
  • Example for a MOSS Farm: 
    • 1x MOSS 2007, Server License
    • 1x MOSS 2007 CAL, Standard Edition
    • 1x SQL 2007 Server, (either Standard or Enterprise)
    • 1x SQL 2007 CAL, (either Standard or Enterprise depending on your SQL edition)
Microsoft SQL Server Internet Connector
  • Same as MOSS 2007 for Internet Site.
Microsoft SQL Server Processor licensing model
  • Licenses are purchase base on the number of processors you have on the server.
  • Licensed per processor.
SQL Server Active and Passive Model
  • If you have two SQL server and one of your SQL server is configure in passive model, then you are not require need to purchase SQL licenses for both servers. You only need licenses for one.
  • Unless the passive server has more processors than the active server, and the active server is licensed under the per processor model.
Virtual Machine and Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition
  • With Enterprise Edition, you are license up to four virtual machines under one physical license. That means with one copy of Windows Server 2003 Enterprise, you can have up to 4 virtual servers running.
Windows Server 2003 Web Edition
  • Licensed per server. Allow unlimited number of user (both internal and external user)
Per Server CAL Licensing Mode for Windows Server
  • With this mode, each CAL is associated to an individual server.
  • Ex: if you have two Windows Server and 20 users access both server, you need 40 CAL (20 for each server)
Per Seat CAL Licensing Mode for Windows Server (or Per Device or Per Users)
  • With this mode, each CAL is associated to the individual devices/user. A user with a single CAL will have access to unlimited number of servers.
  • Ex: if you have five Windows Server and 20 users access all five of the server you only need 20 CAL.
Here is a sample configuration for a MOSS Server farm licensing:
  • MOSS Internet, Intranet, and Extranet Sites. 5 servers farm configuration running MOSS 2007 and SQL 2005 (1 SQL with two process on the server, 2 MOSS front-end, and 1 MOSS backend Index). You have 20 employees which will utilize Enterprise features. Here is what you need
  • 5x Windows Server 2003
  • 2x Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Standard Edition – Processor Licenses (no CALs required)
  • 2x Windows Server 2003 External Connector Licenses
    • You have two MOSS front-end server running on Windows Server 2003, therefore, you need to purchase External Connector license for each server!
  • 3x Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 for Internet Sites
    • All three servers are used by extranet, in this case. The three sites are sharing resource across all three servers so you will need an Internet Sites licenses for all three servers.
  • Three (3) Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS)
  • 20x MOSS CALs, Standard Edition
  • 20x MOSS CALs, Enterprise Edition

Issues with Sharepoint’s Content Deployment Temp File

Issues with Sharepoint’s Content Deployment Temp File

Issues:

  • Content deployment jobs use a import/export functions to deploy its content from Server A to Server B.
  • The exporting server (Server A) will package the changes in a cab-files and forward the cab-files to the importing server (Server B)’s Content Deployment Temporary Files folder.
  • The cab-files are not always deleted and remain in the folder of the Server B’s temporary folder.
  • In some instead, Server B incorrectly deploy an older version of the content and it will some time cause a missing Sharepoint control error (if you have custom Sharepoint control on the page).

The work around:

  • delete the site collection, recreate it, before rerunning the content deployment job, log into the import server and manually delete all the CAB files. Once its all deleted, you can then reran the content deployment job.

Other article on this issue:

http://soerennielsen.wordpress.com/2007/06/19/the-long-path-to-content-deployment/

MOSS Performance Counters

MOSS Performance Counters

Counter

Description

Details

Total Processor Time The % Processor Time counter measures the percentage of elapsed time that the processor spends to execute a non-Idle thread Object: Processor
Counter: %Processor Time
Instance: _Total
Processor Privileged Time Use the % Privileged Time counter to measure the percentage of elapsed time that the process threads spent executing code in Privileged mode Object: Processor
Counter: %Privileged Time
Instance: _Total
Processor User Time Use the % User Time counter to measure the percentage of elapsed time the processor spends in User mode. Object: Processor
Counter: % User Time
Instance: _Total
Process – W3WP Processor Time Measures the % of elapsed time that all process threads use the processor Object: Process
Counter: %Processor Time
Instance: w3wp
Processor Queue Length If the threshold of this rule is exceeded, it indicates that the processor is not fast enough. Object: System
Counter: Processor Queue Length
Page Faults per second Use the counter Page Faults/sec to measure the average number of pages faulted per second Object: Memory
Counter: Page Faults/sec
Available Disk Space Use the % Free Space counter to calculate the percentage of total usable space Object: LogicalDisk
Counter: % Free Space
_total
Disk Request Write Size Uses the Disk Write Bytes/sec counter to measure the rate at which bytes are transferred to the disk during write operations Object: PhysicalDisk
Counter: Disk Write Bytes/sec
Instance: _Total
Disk Request Write Count Measures the rate of write operations on the disk Object: PhysicalDisk
Counter: Disk Writes/sec
Instance: _Total
Disk Usage – Disk Time Use the % Disk Time counter to calculate the percentage of elapsed time that the selected disk drive was busy servicing read or write requests Object: PhysicalDisk
Counter: %Disk Time
Instance: _Total
Disk Block Read Size Avg. Disk Bytes/Read counter to measure the average number of bytes transferred from the disk during read operations Object: PhysicalDisk
Counter: Avg. Disk Bytes/Read
Instance: _Total
Disk Request Read Size Measures the rate at which bytes are transferred from the disk during read operations via Disk Read Bytes/sec Object: PhysicalDisk
Counter: Disk Read Bytes/sec
Instance: _Total
Disk Request Read Count Measures the rate of read operations from the disk Object: PhysicalDisk
Counter: Disk Reads/sec
Instance: _Total
Web Service Bytes Sent/sec Measures the rate at which data bytes are being sent by the //Web service Object: Web Service
Counter: Bytes Sent/sec
Instance: _Total
Web Service Current Connections Monitors current IIS connections Object: Web Service
Counter: Current Connections
Instance: _Total (or per Web app)
Web Service Use the Total Method Requests/sec Counter to measure the rate at which HTTP requests are received Object: Web Service
Counter: Total method Requests/sec
Instance: _Total (or specific Web apps)
Web Service Bytes Received/sec Counter to measure the rate at which data bytes are received by the Web service Object: Web Service
Counter: Bytes Received/sec
Instance: _Total (or per Web app)
Web Service Connection Attempts Measures the rate at which connections to the Web service are being attempted Object: Web Service
Counter: Connection Attempts/sec
Instance: _Total
W3WP Private Bytes Measures the current size, in bytes, of memory that this process has allocated and that cannot be shared with other processes Object: Process
Counter: Private Bytes
Instance: w3wp
W3WP Working Set The Working Set is the set of memory pages recently touched by the threads in the process Object: Process
Counter: Working Set
Instance: w3wp
Committed Memory in use Use the % Committed Bytes In Use counter to measure the ratio of the Memory\Committed Bytes counter to the Memory\Commit Limit counter Object: Memory
Counter: % Committed Bytes In Use
Available Memory Available MBytes counter to measure the amount of physical memory in MB immediately available for allocation to a process or for system use Object: Memory
Counter: Available MBytes
Memory Cache Bytes Shows the sum of the Memory\System Cache Resident Bytes, Memory\System Driver Resident Bytes, Memory\System Code Resident Bytes, and Memory\Pool Paged Resident Bytes Object: Memory
Counter: Cache Bytes
.NET CLR Memory – Bytes Uses the # Bytes in all Heaps counter to sum the following four other counters: Gen 0 Heap Size; Gen 1 Heap Size; Gen 2 Heap Size, and Large Object Heap Size Object: .NET CLR Memory
Counter: # Bytes in all Heaps
Instance: _Global
.Net CLR Data-SQL client Failed connections Use the SqlClient: Total # failed connects counter to count the total number of connection open attempts that have failed Object: .NET CLR Data
Counter: SqlClient
Instance: Total # of failed attempts
.Net CLR Data-SQL client connections Current number of active SQL connections Object: .NET CLR Data
Counter: SqlClient
Instance: Current # pooled and nonpooled connections
.Net CLR memory – large Objects Displays the current size of the Large Object Heap in bytes. Objects greater than 20 KB are treated as large objects by the Garbage Collector and are directly allocated in a special heap Object: .NET CLR Memory
Counter: Large Object Heap size
Instance: _Global
Succeeded Search Queries Use the Queries Succeeded counter to count the number of queries that produce successful searches Object: SharePoint Search Indexer Catalogs
Counter: Queries Succeeded
Instance: Search
Search Query Rate Monitors Query Rate Object: SharePoint Search Indexer Catalogs
Counter: Queries
Instance: Search
Search – total # of Documents Counts the total number of documents in the Index Object: Indexing Service
Counter: Total # of documents
Cache Faults per Second Cache activity is a reliable indicator of most application I/O operations. Object: Memory
Counter: Cache Faults/sec
ASP.NET Requests per Second Counts the number of requests per second Object: ASP.NET Apps v2.0.50727
Counter: Requests/Sec
Instance: _Total
ASP.NET Cache – Hit ratio Cache Total Hit Ratio counter to sum the ASP.NET application performance counters Object: ASP.NET Applications
Counter: Cache Total Hit Ratio
Instance: _Total
ASP.NET Cache Size count the total number of entries within the cache (both internal and user added Object: ASP.NET Applications
Counter: Cache Total Entries
Instance: _Total
Memory – pages per second Measures the rate at which pages are read from or written to disk to resolve hard page faults Object: Memory
Counter: Pages/sec
ASP.NET Worker Process Restart Measures Worker Process Restarts Object: ASP.NET
Counter: Worker Process Restarts
Paging File Measures the percentage of the Page File instance in use Object: Paging File
Counter: %Usage
Instance: _Total
W3WP Handle Count This number is equal to the sum of the handles currently open by each thread in this process Object: Process
Counter: Handle Count
Instance: w3wp
Publishing Object Cache Counts the current number of pools that are associated with the process Object: SharePoint Publishing Cache
Counter: Publishing cache hits/sec
Total number of ISAPI Connections Counts the number of ISAPI connections that Windows SharePoint Services is processing simultaneously. Object: Web Service
Counter: Current ISAPI Extension Requests
Instance: _Total
Total number of ISAPI Requests Number of ISAPI Requests per second Object: Web Service
Counter: ISAPI Extension Request/sec
Instance: _Total